User's Guide

Support Center

Working with Buttons

Last Updated: Aug 18, 2014 02:29PM UTC
Please note this article only applies to Personal, Professional, and District subscription accounts.

Buttons are the most commonly used objects on pages. Use the Button tool to draw a "standard" button.Then you can just start typing to add a label and choose a symbol.

Then use the Button Properties panel to change the button label, symbol, button layout, adjust the button label font, font size, and font color and change the button’s appearance.

Of the many button types offered by the Boardmaker Online Editor, the standard button is the most common. A standard button offers a great deal of potential for design in that it is "blank" when first drawn on a page - it has no preassigned properties, so you can completely customize the button’s appearance and behavior and add whatever labels, symbol, and actions you like.


Draw a Button

 

1. Select the Button Tool in the Toolbar.


2.  Select in the area of the page where you want to place the button.

Note:  You can also move the pointer onto the page, hold down the mouse button, and drag diagonally. Release the mouse button when the new button is the size and shape you want. (Hold down the Shift key to draw a square button.)

Once you have drawn the button, you can resize it or move it:
 
  • To resize the button, select it, then move the pointer over any edge or corner until the double arrow appears. Click and drag the edge or corner until the button is the size and shape you want.
  • To move the button, select it, then drag it to any position in the workspace.

Shortcut:  You can easily use the spray tool to spray out copies of the button to form a rectangular grid. For step-by-step instructions on using the spray tool, see the article, Using the Spray Tool.
 

Add a Label and Symbol to a Button

 

"Edit in Place"


The quickest way to add a label (and symbol) to the button is to simply select the button and type a label.

Select the Enter key. The Symbol Browser will open, prepopulated with symbols that match the label you typed.



 

Select a symbol, or use the search field to search for a new symbol. Then choose the Select button.

or -
 

Select a Symbol

 

Note:  You can only place one symbol on a standard button - if you place another symbol onto a button that already contains a symbol, the symbol will be replaced. (To place multiple symbols on a button, you must convert the standard button to a group button.)

1.  Enter your label text in the Label text box in the Button Properties panel.

2.  Select Choose Symbol.  The The Symbol Browser will open. Select a symbol from the Symbol Browser.



Note: You can also select the Symbols tab on the Button Properties panel. Enter a keyword in the Search box, and then simply drag the symbol you want onto the button.

3.  Select the drop-down list under Symbol and select the layout for the button.


 

Select a Fill Color for the Button


Shortcut: You can select multiple buttons and format them at the same time. (Ctrl + Click or use the mouse to draw a selection box around multiple buttons.)

Select the drop-down list under Fill Color and choose a color for the button.


 

Customize the Button Border

Select a weight, color, and style for the button border.


 

Adjust the Label Font and Size

 

1.  Select a font family from the Font Family drop-down list.


2. Use the drop-down list to select a font size. (Or use the font size adjustment buttons to increase or decrease the font size.)

3. Select a style option (bold, italic, or underlined).
 

Change the Button Type

If you wish, you can use the Button Type drop-down list to change the standard button to a symbolate, word predictor, or group button.


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